CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 20

In June 1929, Winston Churchill began working on a monumental biography of John Churchill, the First Duke of Marlborough; a book he had wanted to undertake for almost thirty years. We visit it next, in our voyage around the works of Winston Churchill.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 19

CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 19

A good deal of Winston Churchill’s literary output was dictated by his finances. When Churchill needed money, he wrote. And Churchill often needed money. The results were usually timeless. Which brings us to THOUGHTS AND ADVENTURES, the next title in our tour of Winston Churchill’s books.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 18

CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 18

Few aspects of Winston Churchill are more controversial right now than his views on India before independence. Fortunately, as with virtually every other Churchillian aspect, there is no need to dredge the internet for misinformation on this subject because he published a book about it, unflinchingly titled: INDIA.

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“THE DAUGHTERS OF YALTA:” A Socially-Distanced Conversation with Catherine Grace Katz

“THE DAUGHTERS OF YALTA:” A Socially-Distanced Conversation with Catherine Grace Katz

Watch our webcast with author Catherine Grace Katz, celebrating the publication of THE DAUGHTERS OF YALTA, streaming right here or on our YouTube channel.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 16

The impending publication of a marvelous new book has inspired us to undertake an author event at Chartwell Bookseller; scrupulously social distanced, of course. (No guests at all.) The book is: THE DAUGHTERS OF YALTA. The author is Catherine Grace Katz. Her event will stream on our YouTube channel Friday, October 2, at 5:00pm (cocktail time).

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 15

CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 15

Winston Churchill wrote his own history of the First World War:
THE WORLD CRISIS. 

We journey to it next in our voyage around the works of Winston Churchill.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 14

CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 14

THE PEOPLE’S RIGHTS is something of a campaign collectable from the 1910 General Election; a compendium of six fiery Churchill speeches attacking the Conservative Party for not supporting “The People’s Budget.” We catch up to it next, and at just the right moment, in our tour of Winston Churchill’s books.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 13

CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 13

Winston Churchill’s first widely-distributed hardcover collection of political speeches was LIBERALISM AND THE SOCIAL PROBLEM. Published in November 1909, these century-old Churchillian orations speak to us more resonantly, pointedly and urgently right now than you would think possible.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 12

CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 12

MY AFRICAN JOURNEY is a Churchillian travelogue documenting Churchill’s vacation scamper through East Africa in 1907.

We visit it next in our stroll through the book-length works of Winston Churchill.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 11

CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 11

Our stroll through the works of Winston Churchill carries us back into the realm of the rarest of Churchill rarities: FOR FREE TRADE, a companion piece to MR. BRODRICK’s ARMY. Together, these two constitute the Holy Grail of Churchill book collecting. 

And yes, we do have one.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 10

CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 10

Not many sons get to write their father’s biography. Winston Churchill wrote a biography of his father, Lord Randolph Churchill, when he was just 31.  In our stroll through his works, LORD RANDOLPH is our next stop.

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CHURCHILL OUT OF HIBERNATION, WEEK 9

MR. BRODRICK’S ARMY is the holy grail of Churchill book collecting; the rarest and most precious volume in the Churchill canon.

In our ongoing stroll through our shelves, we visit it next… if we can only find one.

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